I should…. Not a Book Review Again

I should be doing a book review now.  It’s time.  I finished reading the book over a month ago… I could be already two months and I have not taken the time to review it yet.  I’m not sure why and I’m not going to try to come up with excuses.  I could tell you that it’s because of NaNoWriMo which has been taken quite a bit of time and I could tell you, also, that it’s how busy my life has been … or better yet, I could tell you that I have decided to vlog my NaNo experience and the learning curve has been steep with YouTube so I’ve not had the time to dedicate to reviewing the book.

Although all those things are true.  I have entered NaNoWriMo and have been busy trying, and failing, to meet my word count every day, I could have written the book review for you.  I have been really busy at work but no more busy than I have been at any other point in my life.  I have also decided to vlog my NaNo participation…. Now this one is new and the learning curve is super steep.  I’ve never had so much trouble with my computer as when I’ve tried to get my videos from my library to iMovie.  I think I finally got it to work but don’t ask me how.

So, why am I not reviewing the book you might be asking.  Well, I don’t know.  I liked it.  I actually liked so much that I am thinking I want to write a historical novel.  I don’t feel prepared to do that yet but I have a setting and I have a thought but I’m just not good at romance and the kind of historical novels I like always have a little bit of romance in them.  Just a little, I hate all the gushy type of stuff.  Just a hint makes it so much more interesting.  Anyway, I’m going to learn and practice and perhaps I will write a historical romance novel one day.

So here is what I think the reason I have not reviewed the book is.  I’ve been lazy and focused on other projects.  Things that I need to do in order to survive.  Nope, I’m not being dramatic.  I’m being laid off from my job.  Yep….. the place I’ve been for the past 8 years and the place where I thought I was going to stay forever… well until retirement.  It was a shock, but not really.  I have known for a while, a year, but now it’s real.  I’m being shown the door and I’ve been having trouble figuring out how that makes me feel.  I’m ok.  I’m not suicidal or anything like that.  I’m a little angry and a little upset and going through all the stages of grief so if you just give me a little time and indulge me in what I choose to write I promise the review will come.

I will say that the book is great.  I really liked it so if you waiting for the review to know if you should buy it… there you go.  I think you should and I think you should read it.  Ohhh wait… I haven’t told you what book! Right.

The Carnegies’ Maid

The review will come in the next few days.  I promise!  I just need to get through some more stuff.  In the mean time I hope you are enjoying some of my posts about NaNoWriMo.  Please go visit my YouTube channel where I will giving you a glimpse of my life trying to get through NaNoWriMo and keeping a sense of humor.

thank you so much for understanding.  I’m going to go put in a few more words for my NaNo novel and then write a review….

Thanks again.  Glad you are still here with me.

Ana

Book Review: The Westside by W.M. Akers

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Finally….. I finished reading the book and my original thoughts still stand.  I’m giving this book 3 out of 5 stars.

A young detective who specializes in “tiny mysteries” finds herself at the center of a massive conspiracy in this beguiling historical fantasy set on Manhattan’s Westside—a peculiar and dangerous neighborhood home to strange magic and stranger residents—that blends the vivid atmosphere of Caleb Carr with the imaginative power of Neil Gaiman.

I finished the book earlier this week…. hmm maybe even late last week and I wanted to sit with my thoughts before I posted a review.  I wanted to make sure I liked it or didn’t like it and I’m still not 100% sure I am fully comfortable with my decision.

The writing was great.  I enjoyed and connected with the way the author wrote the story. there are so many quotes in the book that resonated with me  and that gave the story that extra punch that I had to stop tagging pages or I would be tagging every single page. I thought the premise of the story was interesting and it actually was what sold me on this book.  The fact that little mysteries are most often than not the ones that are worth solving.  Well, yeah, that and the fact that it’s set in New York in the 20’s….. What more can one wish for?  However, that’s where I break paths with the book.

Although the premise of the story was great I felt confused reading it.  I was constantly being pulled out of the world trying to figure out what the author was trying to say.  It felt that every time I was immersed in the world and in the action, something would be pulling me right back out.  There were characters that were introduced whom I had no connection with and they appeared from out of nowhere.  There were things going on that I’m not sure added anything to the story and, in fact, they wound up only confusing me even more.  I actually started to feel that it was me.  Perhaps it’s not the right book for me or maybe not the right time for me to be reading this book.  This may be one of those books that I will go back to reading again and again and each time I’ll learn something new.  Maybe I do have to read it again.  I’ll have to give myself some time because right now the confusion is still very raw and I’m not sure I’ll give it the honest chance that the writing deserves.

I will be looking for more books from this author.  The writing was amazing …. here is an example from the first page of the book:

I stole a glove.  It dangled off a table in a decrepit leather shop in Thieves Makes on the East side of Manhattan in sweltering late September 1921, and it was in my bag before I even knew it was in my hand.

This sentence put me in the shoes of the protagonist.  I could feel the heat, I could see the glove and I understood how something just is done without a thought.  It just appeared in the bag….. even before she thought about it.

There are many other passages like this and these were the moments when I was taken to the world where Gilda Carr, our protagonist lives.  This was also the world where I needed to stay in order to understand her and everyone around her but the confusion and the need to bring myself back into the world was jarring.

I’m not giving up.  There’s gotta be something I’m missing.

I’m sorry I didn’t like the book more than I did.

XoXo

Ana

Book Review

Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse

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I heard about this book on Saturday night when I was browsing Goodreads for fantasy and science fiction books to read.  I came across #booktubeSFFAwards2019 (I think I’m saying that right) and realized that the judges were hosting a few read-alongs in the month of May.  Browsing the books I realized that most of them were the second or third books in  a series and since I have quite a few books in progress right now…. Ok, not as many as some other reviewers and bloggers who are much more experienced than I am….. I’m just not as good at keeping all the stories right in my head if I try to read more than two or three books at a time…. I picked this one.  For no other reason than the fact that it is the first in a series.  I knew I was going to spend my Sunday reading since we were going to be stuck in the house while Mother Nature poured down on us forcing us to relax and just hang.

I knew absolutely nothing about the book and to tell you all the truth I didn’t even read any reviews before hitting the “buy” button on my kindle.  To say I was a bit taken by surprise is an understatement.  I mean, I knew it was fantasy, there would be monsters and magic and battles…. that’s what I knew and actually, in a way what I was hoping for.  What I got was….. Wow!!!!!!!

The story follows Maggie Hoskie, a Native American after the United States have succumbed to a massive environmental and political collapse.  In order to protect their people the Gods protected the Nation by erecting a wall (Ohhh noooo, that this wall talk again…..)  to keep the residents away from the chaos taking place outside.  This does not mean that inside the wall things were pleasant.  Far from it….. within the walls there are water and food shortages and monsters have started roaming the earth again.

Maggie is “blessed” with magic from her clan.  Most people are.  The magic they receive, it seems to me, comes from both sides of the family (the mother and the father).  Her magic is speed and strength.  We learn that as a young child she suffered a great loss in and is “adopted” by a non-human (a God, Neizghání) who takes her under his mentorship and teaches her the art of monster slaying she eventually falls in love with Neizghání.  However, If you ask me perhaps what she felt was not love but comfort and the freedom that comes from being loved and understood.  It felt to me, while reading the book that Maggie didn’t have much of that after her loss.  Eventually and suddenly one night Neizghání left her without warning and for the rest of the book she is haunted by remembering him and trying to figure out why he left her.

When we met Maggie, at the start of the story she lives alone in a trailer and she seems to be be ok with that although some times I couldn’t help but feel as if she was longing to share her space with someone.  It was obvious that she wanted that to be Neizghání but I felt as if anyone who brought her some comfort would have done it.  She has no friends and no family except for her three dogs and an old medicine man who lives in a different town who calls her “daughter.”

The story begins when Maggie is hired by a the family of a young girl who has been kidnapped by a monster.  The slaying does not go the way we expect mostly because the monster is not what we or Maggie expected and the young girl dies (Not a spoiler at all).  Ashe returns the remains of the girl to the family, Maggie drives to seek some comfort from the medicine man and that’s where she meets Kai, the medicine man’s grandson, who becomes her traveling companion.  The story takes off from here and ….. It never stops moving….. FAST.

This book is full of action and some times there was so much going on at the same time that I forgot where I was supposed to be looking.  Most of the time we follow the two characters traveling around the Navaho nation looking for things as a way to introduce us to the world and the characters.

The world building was done very well and it was very easy to imagine myself there (not that I would ever want to be there).  Likewise, I felt that the characters were well developed and aside from a few small flaws that got on my nerves, I never felt like I didn’t know a character well enough.  If there is one complaint I have here is overly verbose descriptions which sometimes made the reading slow and made me a bit frustrated.  The other thing that continuously pulled me out of the story were the names. I think this is a problem with me not necessarily the writer.  I felt like I had to read and re-read the names of the towns, the nations and the people in order to get them right and get a feel for who they were.  Not being a native speaker I guess that’s always a problem. I’m not sure ….. Maybe just my problem?

The battles between Maggie and the monsters are described so meticulously that at times they became so real and violent that it made it difficult to continue reading.  There were instances when I had to turn off he e-reader and take a little water break.  This book is not shy on violence.

The novel’s pace was fast and kept me interested and curious wanting to turn the page.  However, as I said above, I could have used a small breather between each action.  It kept me turning the pages.  The only time that it got boring or annoying was during the narration of the landscape or how descriptive some of the passages were.  There are easier ways to get the message across without using so many words.

The climax was….. WOW….. super climaxy (I made up a word) and I could not wait to keep reading.  I felt tired, almost as if I were one of the characters standing there at the end of the story.  One of the plot points did not feel well closed at the end but I’m wondering if that will be resolved in the next book.  I’d love to discuss it here but I don’t want to give anything away…… I was. bit confused about it and can’t wait to see what others thing and if they bring it up.  It has to do with Kai….. If you must know.

This is a really fast enjoyable read and kept me interested.  I think the cliffhanger at the end can take the story in a whole lot of different directions and I’m sure we are all wondering what direction the author is going to be taken 🙂 (I believe the book leads the author and not the other way around).

Great read a solid four stars.

 

Book Review – The Immortal City by Amy Kuivalainen

The Immortal City
Book 1 of The Magicians of Venice
By: Amy Kuivalainen

Publisher – BHC Press
Release Date: September 19, 2019
Category: Fiction/Fantasy/Contemporary
I received this book for review from NetGalley

Summary from the Publisher

In the heart of Venice, a woman is sacrificed to a forgotten god, sparking a mystery lost for thousands of years.

Dr. Penelope Bryne is ridiculed by the academic community for her quest to find the remnants of Atlantis, but when an ancient and mysterious script is found at a murder site, she flies to Venice determined to help the police before the killer strikes again.

Penelope has spent her entire life trying to ignore the unexplainable and magical history of Atlantis, but when she meets the enigmatic Alexis Donato, everything she believes will be challenged. Little does she know, Alexis has spent the last three years doing his best to sabotage Penelope’s career so doesn’t learn the truth—Atlantis had seven magicians who survived, and who he has a duty to protect.

As Alexis draws her into the darkly, seductive world of magic and history, Penelope will have to use her heart as well as her head if she is to find the answers she seeks.

With the new MOSE system due to come online, and Carnivale exploding around them, Penelope and Alexis will have to work together to stop the killer and prevent dark magic from pulling Venice into the sea.

Overall Opinion:

This was a book I could not put down. I would have read it a day if it wasn’t for the fact that real life kept getting in the way (don’t you hate when that happens?)

I found myself towards the middle of the book almost afraid do turning the page because I didn’t want what I thought was going to happen to actually happen. At one point it was almost as if I were watching a movie and I almost had to put my hands in front of my eyes so as to protect myself from what would come next (not very helpful if you’re reading with your eyeballs — may work better if you choose the audiobook option.)

There were some scenes which I felt were a bit slow but the rest of the pacing made up for it. It was a quick book to read (take it from me, I read pretty slow) and it kept me interested in what happened to the protagonist throughout the entire narrative. There was never one point where I could say I didn’t care for the characters (even when they got me really annoyed – see below).

There certainly was a lot of care put into the world I felt the book could have done a much better job at the building the characters. Especially, Penelope. Some times I couldn’t help but feel that she acted like a child instead of a world-renowned archeologist. It felt as if sometimes she was confused as to whether she wanted to be a strong grown up woman able to take care of herself and then other times it felt as if she would break if anyone touched her. I felt frustrated not knowing which Penelope I was going to encounter at any point in my reading.

I started feeling a bit concerned when I realized that there was going to be romance in the book. I’m not much for romantic novels. However, the romance was done so well that I found myself wanting some of the characters to get together and sometimes felt disappointed that they didn’t and other times was sort of glad that they didn’t. I guess there is a time and place for everything right? (you’ll have to read the book to figure out exactly what I’m talking about.)

There were some very detailed descriptions of sacrifices done with animals and people and if your stomach is super weak I would say maybe not to read the full descriptions because they can go into a bit of a detail but for me, being one who does not enjoy gore at all and look away if someone gets a paper cut I found that I was able to cringe through them and they added to the hate I wound up feeling for the villain and the love and admiration I was lead to feel for the protagonist and Alexis Donato.

I think this is a great introduction book to the world of Fantasy and I give this book four stars. I would do five but the development of the protagonist made me crazy sometimes.

Thank you NetGalley for sending me an advance copy and your partnership.

Keep Reading
Ana

The Machine Stops by E.M. Forster

TheMachine Stops

This is a short story initially published in 1909 in the Oxford and Cambridge Review.  The story was then republished in Forester’s short story compilation of The Eternal Moment and Other Stories in 1928.  It has since then received a few awards including in 1965 one of the best novellas and in 1973 it was included in the Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume Two.

The author never tells us what year we are being presented with and that is probably for the best because one of the things about Orwell’s 1984 is that I tend to get distracted when reading it and thinking back to that time.  Ok, I know it’s a work of fiction but I can’t help if my brain tends to always attempt to make connections.  In The Machine Stops, Forester introduces the reader to a civilization who lives underground after having developed a “machine” which seems to take care of their every need.  The Machines takes care of their every need.  Food, water, pure air and, in fact, even their spiritual needs.  The “Book” which I liken it to a spiritual manual is seen in the same way as the Christians see the Bible.

People don’t have to ever leave their homes, although it is permitted, in order to “see” family or read books.  The Machine provides for all their needs.  Things have been this way for so long that people don’t actually want to travel and prefer, instead, to remain in their “rooms” and have their lives taken care of.

The story follows two main characters Vashti and her son Kuno.  They live on opposite sides of the world from each other.  Vashti has grown used to the ways of the machine is content with her life.  She enjoys the isolation of her room and the comforts the machine provides without any effort.  Forester talks about how muscles become attrophied and muscles are looked down upon.  There is no need for a muscular body and, in fact, muscular or bigger babies are euthanized because it’s better for them since if they are stronger they will need to exercise and roam and there is no place in the world of The Machine.  The ability to have discussions (exchange ideas) seem to be the past time and that is done through video messaging with the rest of the world.  There is no human or barely any human contact.  Even procreation is regulated by The Machine.

Kuno, on the other hand has grown curious of the world on the surface of the Earth and has ventured there without the permission of The Machine.  While on the surface he was caught by the machine and now faces the possibility of homelessness – being expelled from the underground and perhaps death (I didn’t quite understand if physical death or death from this type of world).  Kuno calls Vashti, his mother, to come see him at his own and although not happy about having to travel she goes to visit him and he tells her that he’s gone above and that he saw life in the surface.  He recounts how beautiful it was up at the top and that even though he is now facing “homelessness” he rather be there where there is color clarity.  However, the Machine brought him back and now he can’t leave because it won’t let him go.  Vashti dismisses him and goes back to her own home where she resumes the “idea” development and discussion with her “friends” from around the world.

Things begin to change.  First travel outside the “walls” of The Machine become prohibited which Vashti agrees with.  “There is no need to go out there.” and then a new religion appears and humans begin to worship The Book – a book of rules for living in the underground.  All this is accepted and humans forget that they were the ones who build the machine and begin to worship the machine instead of using it.  While this changes are taking place the machine begins to break down and the “Mending Apparatus” is no longer able to repair itself.  Humans begin to complain about moldy smells and the food is not so good and the then the beds don’t appear when called and the bath waters are not as they like it.  Eventually, the hum of the machine stops and since the knowledge of how to repair the machine has been lost the machine finally collapses taking with it a civilization that willingly became subservient to it.

Kuno finds his mother in her room afraid to leave because there were too many people trying to climb to the surface and unable to do so they were dying outside her door.  She feared human contact and therefore hid in her room.  Before they both died they realized that the humans on the surface of the earth would have to be responsible for continuing the species and not repeat the mistakes of the past.

This story has been adapted into a television series called Out of the Unknown.  The series was first aired in 1965 and lasted four season until the producers made the transition into horror instead of Science Fiction.

Although the language, at times, was distracting I enjoyed reading this short story.  The description of the humans not wanting or needing to do things for themselves is something we are experiencing to some extent.  We no longer need to travel to see family or keep in touch with friends.  All our communications can be done via video or phone.  We are constantly connected via technology.   Like in the story we can get anything we want delivered right to our front doors.  We can receive an education on line.  If we are hungry we can order food and have it delivered.  Even this book, I was able to just have it magically appear on my iPad and read it the same day.   It’s not a far stretch to the imagination to see some of the passages in the story taking place today.

If you enjoy SciFi and want a quick read I think this book is still relevant.  I would caution you about the language but otherwise I think it’s a good fast read with an interesting concept.

On to may next book.

Ana

 

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I, Eliza Hamilton by Susan Holloway Scott

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Paperback: 400 pages
Publisher: Kensington (September 26, 2017)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1496712528
ISBN-13: 978-1496712523
Price:  Amazon $11.10

Rating:  3 out of 5 Stars

By the publisher:

As the daughter of a respected general, Elizabeth Schuyler is accustomed to socializing with dignitaries and soldiers. But no visitor to her parents’ home has affected her so strongly as Alexander Hamilton, a charismatic, ambitious aide to George Washington. They marry quickly, and despite the tumult of the American Revolution, Eliza is confident in her brilliant husband and in her role as his helpmate. But it is in the aftermath of war, as Hamilton becomes one of the country’s most important figures, that she truly comes into her own.

In the new capital, Eliza becomes an adored member of society, respected for her fierce devotion to Hamilton as well as her grace. Behind closed doors, she astutely manages their expanding household, and assists her husband with his political writings. Yet some challenges are impossible to prepare for. Through public scandal, betrayal, personal heartbreak, and tragedy, she is tested again and again. In the end, it will be Eliza’s indomitable strength that makes her not only Hamilton’s most crucial ally in life, but also his most loyal advocate after his death, determined to preserve his legacy while pursuing her own extraordinary path through the nation they helped shape together.

My thoughts

coming to this novel knowing little else about Hamilton, other the duel with Burr and the fact that he started the Bank of New York, I was eager to learn about him and the woman who he chose to share his life with.

The author did a great job at setting the scene.  I enjoyed learning about the gowns, the house in which Eliza had grown up with her family and the love that surrounded the family.  The love which surrounded Eliza and her siblings was palpable and the author did a great making sure the reader understood that.  It was obvious that the book was very well researched and there were many “nuggets” that I walked away with which, had it not been for this book, I would have never found out.  Let’s just say they are not the things we learn in school.

Eliza, was a feminist in her time.  As a matter of fact, most of the women, it appeared to me, were feminists.  In their own quiet way these women influenced the outcome of many circumstance and there were many lessons to be learned from them on how to get one’s point across without being rude or obnoxious….. that fact was not wasted on this reader.

At times I was in awe of the friendship and love between Eliza and her sister but I also could not get past the fact that some of it may have been due to jealousy on Eliza’s part.  I don’t know if on purpose or not, but at times I couldn’t help but feel that Eliza regretted at times not having married a rich man.  It was obvious that their love was immense and they lived for each other.  However, at times there were flecks of jealousy in both of them.

Hamilton spent most of his time in the book going from turbulence to turbulence and trying to impress everyone while Eliza was either pregnant and using her pregnancy as a way to manipulate her husband — well at least twice.  Don’t get me wrong, I don’t blame her but it was not what I wanted to be reading about.

The first half of the book was great.  I flew through it devouring every word the author had to say.  Towards the middle of the book I became impatient.  It felt as if the same scenes were being repeated over and over again and there were things that happened through out and characters that were introduced and nothing came of them.  There were times when I felt Hamilton was being a spoiled brat and one who could not take any criticism and would go to any length to revenge people at the expense of everyone.  It’s not as if I felt he didn’t love her…. the fact that he loved Eliza was very obvious but it was not an unconditional love.  It was a dependent type of love.  I felt as if she would have been ok without him, it felt to me as if he would be lost without her.  I also started to get annoyed at how Eliza kept putting herself down.  For the love of God woman — grow a back bone and a sense of who you are.  It’s clear to the reader that Eliza was an amazing woman in her own right but when she kept putting herself down I felt angry instead of sympathy.

I am not sorry I picked up the book.  Perhaps I expected too much from this book considering the hype about Hamilton.  I gave it a solid 3 stars and would have given it 4 had it not been for a few typos and the repetitive issues I mentioned above.  I think that if the reader is interested in women’s issues and feminism this is a good book.  It’s quiet but it gets a point across.  It’s educational in a way that it goes through all the challenges of the wars and not just the battles.  There is hunger and disease to deal with.  There is discussion of how finances are bad and how Hamilton devised a plan to repair the United States’ credit and, although all these topics are discussed it’s still an interesting read.

I was given this book for review.

The Address by Fiona Davis

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The Address by Fiona Davis
Published by Penguin
Date of Publication: August 1, 2017
Hardcover

Publisher’s Summary:

Fiona Davis, author of The Dollhouse, returns with a compelling novel about the thin lines between love and loss, success and ruin, passion and madness, all hidden behind the walls of The Dakota, New York City’s most famous residence.

After a failed apprenticeship, working her way up to head housekeeper of a posh London hotel is more than Sara Smythe ever thought she’d make of herself. But when a chance encounter with Theodore Camden, one of the architects of the grand New York apartment house The Dakota, leads to a job offer, her world is suddenly awash in possibility—no mean feat for a servant in 1884. The opportunity to move to America, where a person can rise above one’s station. The opportunity to be the female manager of The Dakota, which promises to be the greatest apartment house in the world. And the opportunity to see more of Theo, who understands Sara like no one else . . . and is living in The Dakota with his wife and three young children.

In 1985, Bailey Camden is desperate for new opportunities. Fresh out of rehab, the former party girl and interior designer is homeless, jobless, and penniless. Two generations ago, Bailey’s grandfather was the ward of famed architect Theodore Camden. But the absence of a genetic connection means Bailey won’t see a dime of the Camden family’s substantial estate. Instead, her “cousin” Melinda—Camden’s biological great-granddaughter—will inherit almost everything. So when Melinda offers to let Bailey oversee the renovation of her lavish Dakota apartment, Bailey jumps at the chance, despite her dislike of Melinda’s vision. The renovation will take away all the character and history of the apartment Theodore Camden himself lived in . . . and died in, after suffering multiple stab wounds by a madwoman named Sara Smythe, a former Dakota employee who had previously spent seven months in an insane asylum on Blackwell’s Island.

One hundred years apart, Sara and Bailey are both tempted by and struggle against the golden excess of their respective ages—for Sara, the opulence of a world ruled by the Astors and Vanderbilts; for Bailey, the free-flowing drinks and cocaine in the nightclubs of New York City—and take refuge and solace in the Upper West Side’s gilded fortress. But a building with a history as rich—and often tragic—as The Dakota’s can’t hold its secrets forever, and what Bailey discovers in its basement could turn everything she thought she knew about Theodore Camden—and the woman who killed him—on its head.

With rich historical detail, nuanced characters, and gorgeous prose, Fiona Davis once again delivers a compulsively readable novel that peels back the layers of not only a famed institution, but the lives —and lies—of the beating hearts within.

My Review:

This my first novel by Fiona Davis and I can promise you that is will not be the last. I saw this book on the list of “read for review” books on NetGalley and I immediately requested it for review. The cover, which I hope is the one the publisher settles on, drew me in and being that in the past few months I have been fascinated with the 19th Century in New York, this was a no brained for me.

The story revolves around one of the most famous or infamous buildings in Manhattan, one where many celebrities still live, the same one where John Lennon was shot…. One that still today stands tall and is visible from Central Park (see the cover). The Dakota….. it’s 1884 and it’s about to open and Sara Smythe came all the way from England to work and live there and found herself in love with one of the architects. But it’s more than the story of a woman and a man. This is the story of one family, of love and deception, of what secrets can do to a family and of forgiveness and the need we all have to belong and sometimes no belong.

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The author does a great job at working two stories in parallel. At the same time we are reading about the story of Sara and her architect in 1884-85 we are also being shown what is going on in future surrounding the descendants in 1984. The comparison of the Gilded Age and the age of Wall Street and material girls having fun, was not lost on me.

The twists and turns were plenty: throughout the book I felt like I knew what was going to happen at every corner and then the author would turn in a completely different direction and everything would be different. A few pages later, the same thing would happen. I would be feeling like I was totally in control of the scene and bam!!!!!! I was again slammed in a totally different direction. I was hooked. I couldn’t put the book down. As a matter of fact, if it weren’t for my day to day job I probably would have read the book in one sitting. The language is not flowery or poetic as I have often mentioned in previous reviews. It’s instead raw and honest. The type of voice that hits you right in the core and you cannot help but pay attention.

If there was one part where I felt the book was predictable, was the very end. The hero gets the heroin and all is well in the world…… I’m a bit tired of that but, I cannot think of a different way bring the story to a close so I can’t fault the author for this one either. It’s our own fault for always wanting happy endings….. Yeah, I like happy endings even if they’re predictable.

Although the story takes place during the Fall/Winter and there is mention of snow, I feel as if this is the perfect Summer read. I gave this book a 4 1/2 stars only because as I mentioned the ending was predictable. I cannot wait to read more by this author and add this book to one of my favorites of 2017. Going to recommend it to everyone I know.

I hope you enjoy this review.  Until the next one…..

XoXo